Jen Lasher

Bio

Jen Lasher is a singer, songwriter and DJ who is quickly making a name for herself in the electronic music world, creating a niche with her noir and original music. After years of classical piano training, Jen was inspired to spin and create electronic music. Her music combines electro, funk and new wave with gothic and industrial overtones. Jen started touring when she was 19 and since then has performed in the most popular clubs in the U.S.

Jen became friends with DJ Icey and co-wrote and sang in a song called Rain which has been featured in several compilations. She met DJ Baby Anne and they became close friends. Baby Anne encouraged Jen to continue her career as a songwriter and DJ and together they released Battery and Assault a double CD set which includes Jen's original single No More Tears in which her vocals were run through distortion effects, bordering on the edge of industrial music.

Her musical interests range from Kraftwerk, Depeche Mode and New Order to cult gothic groups such as Sisters of Mercy and Nine Inch Nails.

Her energetic and sensual presence onstage and her passion for music has been gaining her recognition in the electronic music industry worldwide.

Interview by Mauricio Saravia

Jen, after years of classical piano training, what inspired you to become an electronic musician and DJ?

I have always had a strong passion for writing music, some of my earliest influences came from the works of Ludwig Van Beethoven, Johann Sebastian Bach, Antonio Vivaldi, Andrew Lloyd Webber, and of course Mozart. I think in the long run it was a lack of the dance beat I have grown to know and love that turned my interest from Classical composition to electronic Djing and producing. Dancing had a huge part to play in this turn of styles; I would go out at any chance that struck to dance for hours on end to electronic music. It was inevitable I would eventually develop interest in this wonderful new sound and decided to create some of my own.

How did you become interested in the metaphysical world?

It has always amazed me how much of our world revolves around abstruse notions. Life’s great mysteries evoke a sense of curiosity in me as well as many others. For example, the underlying philosophical or theoretical principles behind the belief in luck are the metaphysic of a gambler. Luck is a power attributed to go beyond natural forces to make good things happen, which could even be considered supernatural. People’s unceasing belief in luck and good fortune over thousands of years gives an idea of just how important the metaphysical is in our culture. This is what interests me.

Speaking about metaphysics, what are your beliefs?

I am a loose believer in dualism or the metaphysical belief that there are two fundamental substances, material and spiritual. This is a kind of pluralistic ontology concerned with theories of nature and numerous kinds of being. Material is physical and the underlying reality of anything in the empirical world, the spiritual or non-physical is the reality underlying the psychological, the mental, or spiritual world. These two substances can be brought together by something as simple as the smell of a rose. No physical information can truly describe the sheer pleasure captured by its scent.

You have read writers such as Clive Barker, Orson Scott Card and Dean Koontz. What are some of the books that have changed you in some way?

One of the books I read at a young age “The Mists of Avalon” by Marion Zimmer Bradley influenced my views about the roles of women. The story was a saga of the women behind King Arthur’s throne. Although 100% fiction, it taught me a bit about how powerful women are and could have been throughout history regardless of our limitations.

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